Noticeboard

Updated 25/04/2022

May Holidays - The practice will be closed on Monday 30th of May and Friday 3rd of June. If you need any medical assistance during this time, please contact Out of Hours on 111. Many Thanks 

Updated Covid-19 Information - Due to the Covid-19 Assessment Centres closing, from Monday 4th April, please do not hesitate to contact the surgery if:  

  • Your symptoms worsen during self-isolation, especially if you’re in a high or extremely high-risk group
  • Breathlessness develops or worsens, particularly if you’re in a high or extremely high-risk group
  • You have symptoms that you can no longer manage at home

If the surgery is closed, please phone 111

If you have a medical emergency, phone 999 and tell them you have COVID-19 symptoms 

Freedom of Information


The Freedom of Information (FOI) Act was passed on 30 November 2000. It gives a general right of access to all types of recorded information held by public authorities, with full access granted in January 2005. The Act sets out exemptions to that right and places certain obligations on public authorities.

FOI replaced the Open Government Code of Practice, which has been in operation since 1994.

Data Protection and FOI – how do the two interact?

The Data Protection Act 1998 came into force on 1 March 2000. It provides living individuals with a right of access to personal information held about them. The right applies to all information held in computerised form and also to non-computerised information held in filing systems structured so that specific information about particular individuals can retrieved readily.

Individuals already have the right to access information about themselves (personal data), which is held on computer and in some paper files under the Data Protection Act 1998.

The right also applies to those archives that meet these criteria. However, the right is subject to exemptions, which will affect whether information is provided. Requests will be dealt with on a case by case basis.

The Freedom of Information Act and the Data Protection Act are the responsibility of the Lord Chancellor’s Department. A few of its strategic objectives being: 

  • To improve people’s knowledge and understanding of their rights and responsibilities
  • Seeking to encourage an increase in openness in the public sector
  • Monitoring the Code of Practice on Access to Government Information
  • Developing a data protection policy which properly balances personal information privacy with the need for public and private organisations to process personal information

The Data Protection Act does not give third parties rights of access to personal information for research purposes.

The FOI Act does not give individuals access to their personal information, though if a request is made, the Data Protection Act gives the individual this right. If the individual chooses to make this information public it could be used alongside non-personal information gained by the public under the terms of the FOI Act.
 
 



 
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